Spotting Report: A Morning at Budapest Airport and the Neighboring Aeropark Budapest

Spotting Report: A Morning at Budapest Airport and the Neighboring Aeropark BudapestOn my recent trip to Europe, I had a morning to spare in Budapest, and so I decided to rent a car and do some spotting – as well as revisit the Aeropark Budapest museum.

I arrived from Tokyo via Nagoya and Helsinki the night before, and after getting my car, I went straight to Sarokhaz Panzio – my accommodation for the night.

Are you interested in trying business or first class for the price of economy?

If so, you might want to check out Four Ways to Try Business Class Without Breaking the Bank - a free guide that I put together detailing some of the ways I was able to do so - and experiment with some of the methods mentioned in it.

Click here to get the FREE guide

Spotting at Budapest Airport: Runway 31R Landings

The following morning, I left the hotel shortly before 8AM, and headed to a spotting location near runway 31R.

Budapest Airport Rental Car

My rental car – even though rented in Hungary, it had an Austrian number plate.

Before I continue, I will just note here that Budapest airport has a pair of runways – 13R/31L and 13L/31R – that are used simultaneously. In either direction, due to the design of the airport, the “right” runway is used for landings and the “left” one for take-offs.

Now, back to the actual spotting session…

After getting off a roundabout in Vecses, I was off on an unpaved road that led me to the runway. First, I stopped on the road in a place where approach shots could be taken.

As the traffic at Budapest airport is quite slow, I had to wait about 15 minutes until I could photograph the first aircraft. Namely, it was a Q400 of Eurolot.

EuroLOT Q400

Eurolot Q400.

A couple of minutes later, I got the second one – ERJ-195 of Air Dolomiti. Around the same time, a Hungarian spotter came to the spot as well, and offered to take me a bit further down the road to a better location.

Air Dolomiti ERJ-195

Air Dolomiti ERJ-195.

I followed him along the unpaved road for some more minutes, and we arrived at a location along the fence where the aircraft were at a slightly better angle compared to the original approach spot.

As the light was getting worse every minute, I only stayed at the location for about half-an-hour before driving to Aeropark Budapest. Not before the Hungarian spotter showed me some more spotting locations, though. Thank you!

Nonetheless, even in the thirty minutes, I was able to get a couple of aircraft. Those included some European low-cost carriers – such as Wizz Air and Ryanair, as well as carriers like Swiss and Air France.

WizzAir A321

Wizz Air A321.
Ryanair 737-800

Ryanair 737-800.
Swiss A320

Swiss A320 in Star Alliance colors.
Air France A320

Air France A320.
Transavia 737-700

Transavia 737-700.

The highlights for me, though, were an Israir A320 and a Lufthansa A320neo.

Israir A320

Israir A320.
Lufthansa A320neo

Lufthansa A320neo.

Revisiting Aeropark Budapest

With the weather being excellent, but the spotting conditions getting worse due to sun’s position, I headed to Aeropark Budapest – an excellent aviation museum located next to the airport.

And, while I reviewed the museum before, it has moved to a new location since then.

In spite of the move (to a place across the road from the original location), the excellent collection of aircraft remained in its original form – you can still see Tupolev Tu-154 and Tu-134 there, as well as a pair of Ilyushin Il-18s and Yakovlev Yak-40s among other aircraft.

Malev Il-18

Malev Il-18.

If you are interested in the museum, besides reading my old article, I also recommend watching the below video where I did a walk-around of the museum including some commentary.


I spent the rest of the morning at the museum before returning the car and calling it a day.

I was very happy to find that while the conditions for photography got worse for some of the aircraft with the move, it was nowhere near as bad as I had imagined from some of the photos I had seen before going to the renovated museum.

Below are some more photos I took during my visit so that you can judge for yourself.

Malev Il-14

Malev Il-14 (this aircraft originally wore Soviet Air Force livery).
Flight Inspection Service Yak-40

Flight Inspection Service Yak-40.
Linair Yak-40

Linair Yak-40.
Malev Tu-154

Malev Tu-154.
Malev Tu-134

Malev Tu-134.
Flight Inspection Service Let-410

Flight Inspection Service Let-410.
Malev An-2

Get Your FREE "Four Ways to Try Business Class Without Breaking the Bank" Guide

No, I am not going to tell you how to fly in first class and sip Dom Perignon for free…

But, I am going to introduce you to a couple of ways you can experiment with to try a business class flight without having to spend thousands of dollars.
Malev Aero Club An-2.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Get Your FREE "Four Ways to Try Business Class Without Breaking the Bank" Guide

No, I am not going to tell you how to fly in first class and sip Dom Perignon for free…

But, I am going to introduce you to a couple of ways you can experiment with to try a business class flight without having to spend thousands of dollars.

How Can I Help You?